12 December, 2015

{Read} Girl on the Train

 A friend recently invited me to attend her bookclub with her. She described it as an eclectic group of ladies ranging in ages from 28 to 88, good food and wine and even better conversation and company. Who wouldn't jump at a chance to join a group like that!


The book that was selected for December was  The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins.
Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. “Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?



I had actually read this book over the summer and was terribly underwhelmed. I felt like I had missed something because I couldn't figure out what all the hype was about the book. It took me, what felt like forever to finish trudging through the story, hoping that at the end it would all make sense and I would finally figure out why everyone I knew who has read it, loved it.

It never happened.

To start, I found the timeline a bit wonky. I found myself having to look back at previous chapters to figure out where we were in the story and who the narrator was (the book was written in a similar style to Gone Girl as it was told from a different characters perspective).

But my biggest issue with the book is that none of the characters were likable. I suppose in that aspect the author did a wonderful job at creating characters that were so flawed, it was near impossible to find anything even remotely good about them. In the end, I had no one to root for. I couldn't get behind a single one of them, hoping things would work out for him/her. It's hard to get behind a book when you can't find something to hope for in the end.


 

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